BUSH TREES AND FRUITS OF BROOME

THE REMNANT RAIN FOREST

'INTRODUCED PLANT PESTS'

BUSH TREE SHOWCASE

http://www.naturebase.net/florabase/index.html

The Kimberley bush should not be burnt without knowledge - too often it is overburnt, burnt at the wrong time or burnt deliberately.  This can destroy wildlife and trees especially if it occurs frequently.

"NORTHERN AUSTRALIA FIRE INFORMATION"

Feature article: The Jigal tree

Feature article: The Boab tree

New plants discovered in the Kimberley

Broome wild flowers

  1. Abrus precatorioius - giddi giddi
  2. Acacia adoxa - small low wattle - long 4cm seed pod and flowering late Sept.
  3. Acacia colei (Soap wattle)
  4. Acacia holosericea (Soap Tree)
  5. Acacia dunnii* (not native to this area) (Elephant Ear Wattle)
  6. Acacia eriopoda (Pindan Wattle) - very silvery in late Sept
  7. Acacia monticola - very prickly rough flaking bark - curled pods in September
  8. Acacia platycarpa - flowers in March - very white - 3 veins to each leaf
  9. Acacia translucens* (not native to this area)  (Poverty Bush)
  10. Acacia tumida (Wongai/Spear Wattle)
  11. Adriana tomentosa (alongside the walking track Cable Beach) 'not common'
  12. Atalaya hemiglauca - (guwarru)
  13. Bauhinia cunninghamii (Jigal Tree)
  14. Brachychiton diversifolius (Northern Kurrajong) - luminous green heart leaves in early November.
  15. Breynia Cernva (Euphorbiaceae) Page 100 "Broome and Beyond" - Footpath Gubinge Rd. Large dense bush.
  16. Canavalia rosea - Beach bean
  17. Carissa lanceolata (Conkerberry or Kungkura)
  18. Capparis lasiantha (Native passionfruit) - in September
  19. Cassytha filiformis (Yugulu) Koodikoodi
  20. Cleome viscosa - Mustard bush - yellow star flower - put behind your ear to keep flies away
  21. Clerodendrum tomentosum (velvet leaves) amazing photo - flowering Nov
  22. Crotalaria cunninghamiiRattlepod bird flower tree - green new growth in August -March on Roebuck Plains
  23. Crotalaria medicinia - 3 leaves
  24. Cyperus bulbosus (bush onion) - sand dunes, closed grassland
  25. Disticholstemon hispidulus (Moondoorj)
  26. Dolichandrone heterophylla (Lemon Wood)
  27. Ehretia saligna (Native Willow or Peachwood)
  28. Erythrophleum chlorostachys (Iron wood)
  29. Eucalyptus bigalerita - Northern salmon gum.  Just before Lennard River.
  30. Eucalyptus camaldulensis - River red gum - drops bark in November - seeds in December.  Native at Manari and Carnot Bay.
  31. Corymbia flavescens (formerley Eucalyptus flavescens) - Wrinkle leaf ghost gum - bark - leaves.  (found near the Nulungu water hole)  SEED CAPS ARE PINK.  (Example at green tank near water fountain and open lawn area flowering November)
  32. Corymbia paractia - Cable Beach ghost gum
  33. Corymbia bella - Weeping Ghost gum - Willie Creek to Prices Point
  34. Corymbia polycarpa - (formerley Eucalyptus polycarpa) - great example at the corner of Barker and Weld St. near the Dentist's.  Also the island opposite the Tropicana and the sand ridge by the Golf Club.
  35. Corymbia greeniana  (formerly Euc. Terminalis) (inland Bloodwood - most dominant eucalyptus in the Kimberley)
  36. Eucalyptus tectifica - Darwin Box
  37. Eucalyptus (Corymbia) zygophylla (Broome Bloodwood)
  38. Ficus opposita (Sandpaper fig) - in September
  39. Gardenia pyriformis - (Native gardenia)
  40. Gossypium australe (Native cotton) prominent  and common late Sept
  41. Gossypium rotundifolium (white hibiscus or pink) Flowers Jan-June
  42. Grevillea refracta (Silverleaf Grevillea)
  43. Grevillea pyramidalis (Willing or Caustic Tree)
  44. Grewia breviflora - coffee fruit - gum tree avenue
  45. Grewia polygamma (dog's balls) - nice green bush in March
  46. Grewia retusiforlia (shrub)
  47. Gyrocarpus  Americanus (Helicopter tree)
  48. Hakea macrocarpa (Boomerang Tree) - leave strap like, flowers May- July, large clump of flowers
  49. Hakea aborescens (Kylie tree: flowers in February, thin leaves, large pod, small clump of flowers)
  50. Hibiscus apodus (formerley panduriformis) - yellow hibiscus
  51. Ipomoea pes-caprae (beach morning glory - pink flower)
  52. Jacquermontia paniculata (white morning glory)
  53. Jasminum didymum - creeper - black little fruit in June
  54. Lysiana spathulata (Nilli Nilli
  55. Macroptilium atroppurpureum (purple bean) - creeper - South America - aggressive weed
  56. Melaleuca acaciodes - coastal paperbark
  57. Melaleuca argentea - silver cadjeput - weeping - air is full of the honey smell in September
  58. Marsdenia viridiflora (Magabala or Bush Banana)
  59. Maytenus cunninghamii (corky shrub)
  60. Myoporum tenuifolium - gawar - purple small fruit in August in coastal sand dunes - toxic to cattle..
  61. Pavetta browni
  62. Psoralea martinii -- purple flower in September - greyish white wool - named in 1864 at Roebuck Bay
  63. Persoonia falcata (Wild Pear) - Wankid - NOV
  64. Ptilotus exaltatus (Pink Mulla, Mulla) - Native spinach
  65. Premna acuminata (Firestick tree)
  66. Senna notabilis -  The cockroach bush - August
  67. Sida rohlenae - low shrub - yellow flowers - Jan - 10 km east of Broome
  68. Spinifex longifolius - beach spinifex - really binds the sand dunes - stops erosion
  69. Templetonia hookeri* (Rooroo)
  70. Terminalia cunninghamii - Pindan Walnut
  71. Tinospora smilacina (Snake vine)
  72. Tricholesma zehlanicum - 1 metre high - sky blue flowers - camel bush (common alongside the walking track at Cable Beach) prickly
  73. Tylophora cinerascens - oyster-catcher bill
  74. Velleia panuriformis - one erect stem - flower bright orange colour - one metre high.
  75. Ventilago viminalis (Medicine Bark)
  76. Wrightia saligna (Yellow Wax Flower)

SPEAR GRASS

Coconut wells-Beagle Bay road

  1. Codonocarpus cotinifolius (desert poplar) 5m, especially in burnt areas, camels love it.

  2. Velleia panduriformis (pindan poison) 1.5m,  long stems from a central area, yellow flowers, especially after fire.

  3. Sida rohlenae - low shrub - yellow flowers - Jan - 10 km east of Broome

  4. Trichodesma zeylanicum (camel bush) very common especially after a fire.  Flowers are pale blue.  Brown honeyeaters eat the nectar in September.  Hairs can irritate.

     

The spiky inflorescences of Beach Spinifex (Spinifex longifolius), commonly found growing on sand dunes on the Kimberley coast.