1929

A rematch of the previous year's Grand Final occurred in May 1929, when Wanderers increased their dominance winning with a score of 22:8 to Rovers 4:2 however, both sides fielded terribly short.

Interest had clearly diminished from the euphoria of years earlier, so much so that players were warned in the Nor West Echo that "If the game is to continue here every player will have to give up his Sundays to the game and decide and do it quickly."

Regrettably this stirred no one into action and especially the Committee who in previous seasons had numerous helpers and even boasted to having up to five Vice Presidents at one time so a short cryptic statement was printed in the Echo similar to the famous obituary notice of 1882 in England that signified the death of cricket and the tradition of playing for the Ashes.

"After eight and half years of virulent existence the local football club gave up the ghost during the week. No flowers." 25 May 1929.

Cricket continued on as the winter sport each Saturday but one year later the Nor West Echo ceased and the Great Depression had hit hard. However, according to Peter Haynes (Nov 1998), 'Broome did not experience the same hardships as the rest of Australia until the depression was almost over. Broome then suffered extremely badly especially since the pearling industry then began its long slump'.

South Broome Football team.Blue dyed singlets:

(L -R) Viv Ogilvie (Umpire), Harold Redfern (brother of Freddie Redfern - worked at the Power House), Jack Dobson (owned the grocery shop - a good footballer), Jim Milner (owner of Sun Pictures as well as the Ice and Cordial factory, Percy Thompson (came from the eastern states and worked for Bert Kennedy),

Front row: Ernie Hanks (mechanic), Ernie Walker (worked in the Post Office - a good footballer), Ted St.John (pearler, Alec McDonald (worked at the airport).

(Information supplied by Peter Haynes Perth (father of Des) Nov 1998. He related that Football in those days was played on Sundays and was a 'serious business'. According to Peter, they used to get very good crowds.

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