1925

Innovation can often engender new life and change for the better. Such was the case when Broome, after many long discussions, had decided to install an electric light scheme for all the people of the town.

Similarly, the Football Association had introduced the 'send - off' rule and the 'two umpire system' in the late 1970's before their official inception and, amazingly, a new rule was formulated in 1925 that gave the opposition a free kick if the ball was kicked out of bounds that was over 50 years before its time. A second rule required that "the ball must be struck with closed fist" which would have nullified the 'flick pass' controversy of the 1960's that Footscray Football Club introduced. It must be added however, that "most players showed a flagrant disregard" of this latter rule.

As the season unfolded, attention once more turned to Umpire Ogilvie who was accused of being a "bit sudden with the whistle for on the shoulder and holding the ball". Furthermore, "a regrettable incident occurred at the end of the third quarter, when a display of temper by a South player caused a disturbance. The umpire, who's ruling was ignored, left the field, followed by the teams. The offending player apologised and the matter having been amicably settled, the teams then returned to he field an finished the game. When will some players realise that games are played for the purpose of inculcating self control, and the ability to give and take hard knocks in a clean and manly spirit and also for the purpose of eradication pettiness? Also paltriness and selfishness! A player may be good individually, but if individuality is to be used effectively, it must be used for the benefit of the team and in the best interests of the game. Not for self aggrandisement."

He'd gone on to say, "The player who resorts to questionable tactics, or allows personal animosity to enter into the game, is a nuisance to his side, and his unsportsmanlike attitude has a detrimental effect on the game in general. In fact, one of the object of playing games is to eliminate personalities and create a better feeling that will enable one to recognise merit even in one's bitterest opponent. Those who allow personal animosities to enter into sport have not even a very elementary knowledge of sportsmanship or manliness, and after Sunday's experience it is to be hoped that the remaining matches will be played in a proper sporting spirit, and leave pleasant recollections in the minds of players and spectators. We all 'chip; the umpire that is natural on the spur of the moment, but players and spectators must remember that he has an unenviable position, and that he is controlling the game in a very able manner. Consequently, if we expect the best form him, his authority on the field cannot, and must not be questioned". As printed in the Nor West Echo, 8 August 1925. Two weeks later, South had won its fourth Premiership.

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